Free-spirited, self-deprecating and always ready to tell it like it is, Amanda Peet is not afraid to let loose with a bit of fun and a good laugh at a time.

Amanda is a mom of three daughters and one son, who grew up in the inner-city Toronto neighbourhood of Etobicoke.

After a brief stint as a ballet dancer, Peet moved to New York to be closer to her family and started performing.

In 2012, she began performing at clubs, in public places and at her own private dance party, Free-Swing Dance Mom.

The club has grown in popularity and is now a regular fixture at parties, weddings and other events.

Peet says she has learned a lot about herself as a dancer, and that she enjoys sharing her story.

“There’s something that I’m learning in life that’s always kind of in my back pocket,” she said.

I can still feel myself, but it’s not so much that I feel like my life’s on fire anymore. “

The way I live my life is a little bit different than everybody else’s.

Amanda Peets dance career highlights 1. “

That’s a good thing.”

Amanda Peets dance career highlights 1.

Free-swing dancing: Peet, now 31, performed for free at a Toronto dance party in 2014.

2.

Getting to know her daughter, Emily, in her early 20s: “She was a little kid at the time, and I had a hard time getting her to dance with me, but I didn’t mind.

It was her first time, so I didn, either.”

3.

Dance-off wins the annual Canada’s Best Dance Competition: “I’d never been to a competition before, but the judges came back and said, ‘I think you’ve got a real chance.'”

4.

The family that moved to Canada to be close to their parents: “There was no such thing as a ‘mama’s boy.'”

5.

A free-spiriting, self devious style: “It was a big shift from my traditional dance moves.

But I think the best part is that I learned a little about myself. “

When I first got the choreography down, I was really nervous.

Amanda Peeters first dance experience: “A friend of mine asked me to join the Toronto Free-Standing Dance Association, which is a group of people who do free-standing dances, and we ended up dancing together.” “

For me, it was all about, ‘If I can get away with this, I can have fun.'”

Amanda Peeters first dance experience: “A friend of mine asked me to join the Toronto Free-Standing Dance Association, which is a group of people who do free-standing dances, and we ended up dancing together.”

Free-standing dancing: “The basic principle is that the dancers sit on a platform and they jump, swing and jump around.

It’s a pretty cool thing to do.””

When I started dancing, I thought it was just another choreographed dance,” Peet said.

The first time she tried it, she found it hard to balance the weight of the dancer, a woman with a long, brown hair.

“She jumped so hard, I ended up falling on top of her.”

Peet continued dancing at Free-Stand and later, Free Dance Mom, and began doing solo dances.

But by then, she was a free-lance performer herself.

“It became clear that there were a lot of people out there who were dancing without the help of a choreographer, so we decided to form a group and start doing free-stands,” she recalled.

“After a while, I got the whole dance thing down.”

Free dance mother: “We’ve always had a group.

We’re a family now.”

Amanda was one of many people who found a way to get into the dance.

“A lot of my friends were really into the free-sights, and it really helped me.

I had been doing freestands my whole life and they really helped us get better at it.”

She found the freedom to be more expressive and free-bodied.

“Free-sight is the best word for it,” Peets said.

Free standing dance mum: “Sometimes when I do Free-stand I feel a little nervous, but you have to give it your all.”

Free dancing for the first time: “That was a really special experience.”

Peets now has over 150 free-Standing dance parties, including the annual Free-Wings dance competition.

She says she gets a lot out of the free dances, especially with the younger dancers.

“They have so much fun.

It brings a lot to the table,” she added.

Peets is also an instructor at the Toronto Public School’s Ballet Centre, where she teaches free-sight dancing.

“Ballet is my life and my passion.

It has changed my life,” she says.

“As a dancer and teacher, I want to continue to improve myself.”

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